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Online Business Models
Web-Based Business Strategies and Monetization Models
Curated by Robin Good
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Google Helpouts: Not With Friends But With Teachers

Google Helpouts: Not With Friends But With Teachers | Online Business Models | Scoop.it
Robin Good's insight:



Google has made public a new service built on top of Google Hangouts and which allows qualified users to deliver online coaching and mentoring sessions on just about any topic. Either for free or for a fee. Google will handle payments and keep 20% of the compensation you receive.


From TheNextWeb: "Google is currently testing Helpouts — touted as “a new way to connect people who need help with people who can give help, over live video, anytime, anywhere”.


The new service will be tied into Google+ and it’s basically Google Hangouts: not with friends, but with teachers."



More info: http://thenextweb.com/google/2013/08/21/google-quietly-introduces-helpouts-google-hangouts-that-connect-people-to-experts/ 


https://support.google.com/helpouts/#topic=3164466 


Reserve your seat right now: https://helpouts.google.com/welcome 





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HUBMODE's curator insight, July 28, 2014 11:59 AM

L'HUmain au centre,parler,demander,en continu!

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How To Build a Competitive Business Model on the Footprints of Google, Facebook, Amazon and Apple

How To Build a Competitive Business Model on the Footprints of Google, Facebook, Amazon and Apple | Online Business Models | Scoop.it
Robin Good's insight:

Thanks to Marty Zwilling on StartupProfessionals for distilling some of the key traits that have made Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Google such uniquely successful companies.


From the article intro: "According to many technology pundits, including Phil Simon, in his book “The Age of the Platform,” these four exemplify the rise of platforms with applications as a business model, rather than a single product or service. Whether you believe his conclusion or not, you can learn a lot from the lessons he offers on how to build a competitive business model today."


The article provides ten key principles utilized by this "gang of four" to reach their broad business success.


Here my favorite four:


1) Act small. “Bigness” and all of its attendant problems – bureaucracy, politics, infighting, and the like – put any business model at risk. Bureaucracy and excessive democracy kill speed. Shake organizations up often to avoid stiff and inflexible management structures.

2) Be open and collaborative. Startups as well as large companies must be open to all sorts of new ventures, partnerships, and offerings. Make application programming interfaces (APIs) open and freely available to developers, partners, and consumers.


3) Move quickly and decisively when spotting a niche. Don’t confuse patience with inertia. Waiting too long means that an opportunity may disappear permanently – or someone else may beat you to the punch. Temper expectations, but make the bet.


4) Use existing tools. It’s time consuming, expensive, and simply unnecessary for every company to create its own tools and base functions (planks) from scratch. By using outposts, businesses increase serendipity, exposure, and cross-pollination.



Valuable. To the point. 7/10


Full article: http://blog.startupprofessionals.com/2013/03/10-entrepreneurial-lessons-from-gang-of.html



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Tom Hood's curator insight, February 22, 2014 10:44 AM

is your next business model a platform?


This great blog post captured by curator Robin Good talks about platforms and the gang of four (Amazon, Google, Apple, and Facebook). 

 

"Today’s dizzying pace of change shows no signs of abating. If anything, it is likely to accelerate. So do everything you can to heed these lessons today, to be as prepared as possible for a vastly different tomorrow."


The ten lessons identified remind me also of the work of Rita McGrath (End of Competitive Advantage) who talks about six key areas in what she calls "The New Strategy Playbook":


1. Continuous Reconfiguration
2. Healthy Disengagement
3. Deft Resource Allocation
4. Innovation Proficiency
5. Discovery Driven Mindset
6. Entrepreneurial Career Management


and also the book, The Power of Pull...

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Is Google the Killer of Newspaper Print Ad Sales?

Is Google the Killer of Newspaper Print Ad Sales? | Online Business Models | Scoop.it
The U.S. newspaper industry has lost more than $40 billion in ad revenue in the past decade — over half of that in the last four years alone — and Google’s ad revenues are now more than twice what the industry pulls in.
Robin Good's insight:


From the original article by Mathew Ingram on Paidcontent.org: "...ad revenue falling off a cliff about a decade ago, hitting a brief plateau in the mid-2000s and then free-falling over the next several years.

...The speed with which billions of dollars in advertising revenue simply evaporated over the past decade is incredible.


...Of course, all of that advertising revenue didn’t simply disappear overnight. So where did it go if it wasn’t going to newspapers? It went online, naturally — and the second chart shows the biggest beneficiary of that exodus: namely, Google."


Intruiguing hypothesis and data correlation. Must read. 8/10

*lots of interesting comments too


Ful article: http://paidcontent.org/2013/04/11/two-charts-that-tell-you-everything-you-need-to-know-about-the-future-of-newspapers/




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jalp Internet Consulting Services's comment, April 19, 2013 7:25 AM
Google transformed advs and made them accesible to SME's. So low budget marketing departments can act more easily, even if they run their campain through agances.
Guillaume Decugis's comment, April 22, 2013 11:33 AM
@Jalp: good point and an essential reason that drove this change. Not just attention but lowering the barrier to entry. Thanks!
Kitty A. Smith's comment, May 6, 2013 2:37 PM
People are always looking to place fault. Things change when something better comes along. Just because newspapers were first doesn't mean they are best. Tobacco knows time is limited, that would explain why they bought Kraft Foods!