Online Business Models
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Online Business Models
Web-Based Business Strategies and Monetization Models
Curated by Robin Good
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How To Build a Competitive Business Model on the Footprints of Google, Facebook, Amazon and Apple

How To Build a Competitive Business Model on the Footprints of Google, Facebook, Amazon and Apple | Online Business Models | Scoop.it
Robin Good's insight:

Thanks to Marty Zwilling on StartupProfessionals for distilling some of the key traits that have made Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Google such uniquely successful companies.


From the article intro: "According to many technology pundits, including Phil Simon, in his book “The Age of the Platform,” these four exemplify the rise of platforms with applications as a business model, rather than a single product or service. Whether you believe his conclusion or not, you can learn a lot from the lessons he offers on how to build a competitive business model today."


The article provides ten key principles utilized by this "gang of four" to reach their broad business success.


Here my favorite four:


1) Act small. “Bigness” and all of its attendant problems – bureaucracy, politics, infighting, and the like – put any business model at risk. Bureaucracy and excessive democracy kill speed. Shake organizations up often to avoid stiff and inflexible management structures.

2) Be open and collaborative. Startups as well as large companies must be open to all sorts of new ventures, partnerships, and offerings. Make application programming interfaces (APIs) open and freely available to developers, partners, and consumers.


3) Move quickly and decisively when spotting a niche. Don’t confuse patience with inertia. Waiting too long means that an opportunity may disappear permanently – or someone else may beat you to the punch. Temper expectations, but make the bet.


4) Use existing tools. It’s time consuming, expensive, and simply unnecessary for every company to create its own tools and base functions (planks) from scratch. By using outposts, businesses increase serendipity, exposure, and cross-pollination.



Valuable. To the point. 7/10


Full article: http://blog.startupprofessionals.com/2013/03/10-entrepreneurial-lessons-from-gang-of.html



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Tom Hood's curator insight, February 22, 2014 10:44 AM

is your next business model a platform?


This great blog post captured by curator Robin Good talks about platforms and the gang of four (Amazon, Google, Apple, and Facebook). 

 

"Today’s dizzying pace of change shows no signs of abating. If anything, it is likely to accelerate. So do everything you can to heed these lessons today, to be as prepared as possible for a vastly different tomorrow."


The ten lessons identified remind me also of the work of Rita McGrath (End of Competitive Advantage) who talks about six key areas in what she calls "The New Strategy Playbook":


1. Continuous Reconfiguration
2. Healthy Disengagement
3. Deft Resource Allocation
4. Innovation Proficiency
5. Discovery Driven Mindset
6. Entrepreneurial Career Management


and also the book, The Power of Pull...

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Publishers as Curators: A New Model for Doing Business Online — HBS Working Knowledge

Publishers as Curators: A New Model for Doing Business Online — HBS Working Knowledge | Online Business Models | Scoop.it

Robin Good: If you are looking for an alternative way to look at how your online publishing business could thrive in the future, you may want to take into consideration your local art museum. At east, this is what Assistant Professor Ray Weaver suggests.


Here's why:


From the original article: "...what Groupon is up to is much more sophisticated than just offering 50 percent-off coupons.


Groupon, along with companies like Apple, Facebook, and Progressive Insurance, is a leading example of firms that are thinking about customers in a new way—much like how a museum curator orchestrates the experience of patrons.


Weaver, an assistant professor in the Marketing Unitat HBS, believes that part of Groupon's success is borne of the careful way the company presents wares to its customers: providing a very limited amount of choices at a time, along with a brief, engaging description of each offering.


To that end, Weaver is exploring the idea that many consumer-centric web-based businesses would benefit from acting more like museum curators.


....


Curators don't just put the stuff out there.


They make choices about which pieces to put next to other pieces, and put little plaques next to them explaining why you should care," he explains. "They educate their 'customers' about what they're looking at. And that is the missed opportunity in many for-profit businesses today."


Good reading. Truthful. 8/10


Full article: http://hbswk.hbs.edu/item/6770.html


(Image credit: AllArtNews.com) 

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